Coping with Financial Loss when Bankrupt

When I recognized that my bankruptcy clients appeared to be engaging in grieving behaviors, I consulted with Sameet M. Kumar, PhD, author of “Grieving Mindfully: A Compassionate and Spiritual Guide to Coping with Loss.” My suspicions were right — all types of loss, including financial loss, trigger the five stages of grief. All the financial loss will be recovered with the help of bankruptcy lawyer san diego. There should be disclosing of all the facts to the lawyer for the winning of the lawsuit. 

Interestingly enough, when my clients understand this emotional process they move through each stage more quickly. Hopefully, the description of the five stages of grief and typical reactions below will help you recognize that while you feel bankrupt in more ways than one, your life will not only improve, but thrive as well.

Denial or “This isn’t happening to me” stage. The first stage is often triggered when a setback such as a job or financial loss occurs. Not wanting to face a lifestyle change, decisions are made based upon false hope. This is when bankrupt clients make the mistake of dipping into their retirement funds to pay house payments and other bills. The problem is that these funds can often be protected and are needlessly wasted as a result – yet another financial loss.

Anger or “I could have done something differently” stage. It is hard for a bankrupt client to watch the life that they built disappear. While the economy is the biggest factor in most client’s financial losses, clients tend to direct their anger on themselves. At this stage, they often believe that they could have done something differently to prevent the bankrupt status and resulting financial loss.

Bargaining or “Tell me what I need to do to fix this” stage. This is the stage my clients are often in when I first meet them. They are looking for answers. They want to know how to hold onto their lifestyle even though bankrupt. Working together, we assess the options available while focusing on setting aside the emotional aspects so that they may make sound, objective decisions. Most importantly, explaining the cycle of the grieving process helps many to step back and look at their situation realistically. It frees them to begin taking productive steps forward, leaving behind the financial loss.

Depression or “I’m facing reality and I don’t like it” stage. After first meeting my clients, they usually take one to six months to consider their options. During this time, I often field telephone calls and answer questions about the options we discussed. It is an important part of the process that cannot be rushed.

Acceptance or “I’m ready to put this behind me and move forward” stage. When my clients are ready to proceed, the difference in their demeanor is almost magical. The bankrupt depression is gone and they are upbeat. They see the possibilities in a new, debt-free life. Accepting the bankrupt status, they take the steps necessary to free themselves of the stress that comes with financial loss and the burden of the grieving process.

When asked why I find representing bankrupt clients rewarding, I explain that I find pleasure in knowing that my clients emerge from the financial loss as whole, emotionally healthy people who are not only wiser, but appreciative of their new, saner lifestyle, as well.

Emma

About Emma

Emma Logan is the content coordinator of Beverly Lahaye Institute. She’s been freelancing for many years and now focuses on WordPress development and blog design